Posts Tagged ‘Young Adult’

Mini reviews: Snow Angels, Ella Enchanted, and Big Red Tequila

April 17th, 2011    Posted in 52 Books in one year challenge, Award-Winning, Fantasy, Fiction, Kelly, Mystery, Young Adult
 

I’ve been on the fence the past few days about reviewing the three—three—books I’ve read in the past week. I enjoyed all of them, but I didn’t want to write an in-depth reviews. But then I realized a short blurb for each book meets the spirit of my 52 books in one year challenge. Plus all of these books are worth mentioning.

Snow Angels is the first in the Detective Vaara series by James Thompson. (The second novel in the series, Lucifer’s Tears was reviewed on this site earlier this year.)

The scenery and climate of Northern Finland during December, aka the darkest days of the years, is as important to the novel as the actual crimes of the novel. Adding to the complexity of the story are facets of the Laestadian religion and Finnish culture. As someone who’s lived in Finland—and has Laestadian ancestors—I appreciated this book on multiple levels, including for its insight into Finnish culture. This is a good series for mystery buffs.

After reading and reviewing Fairest, I picked up Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine from my local library. There’s not much to say other than I loved it. It’s a great retelling of Cinderella. It’s easy to root for Ella as a character, and I love the idea of gifts (like Ella’s gift of “obedience”) turning into curses.

Last of all, since I’ve read all of Rick Riordan’s middle grade novels, I decided to pick up the first in his Tres Navarre mystery series for adults. In Big Red Tequila, Tres Navarre returns to his hometown of San Antonio to rekindle a relationship with his childhood sweetheart. He left town ten years before after seeing his Sheriff father gunned down in the front yard of his home. His father’s murder was never unsolved, and now it’s time for Tres to use the private investigator/English PhD/tai chi skills he honed in San Francisco.

Big Red Tequila is a fun read, and it’s definitely meant for an adult audience. Robert Johnson, Tres’ cat, is perhaps the best drawn character in the novel. The setting—San Antonio, Texas—adds color to the novel. This is a good choice for mystery fans.

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A new way to turn on, tune out, and drop out: Feed by M. T. Anderson

March 15th, 2011    Posted in 52 Books in one year challenge, Dystopian, Fiction, Kelly, Science Fiction, Young Adult
 

Imagine having your brain hardwired to stream music, TV, and advertisements. All day. Learning actual information isn’t that important: you can look it up. Instantly. In your head.

In the dark and dystopian world of M. T. Anderson’s Feed, everyone is connected, literally. “Feeds” are interwoven within brains and allow the USA’s population—well, 78% of the country—to be connected in a sort of wide reaching internet. When Titus spends spring break on the moon—and the moon “sucks”, by the way—he meets Violet, a girl unlike any he’s ever known. She’s pretty, smart, and has been homeschooled away from privileged students like Titus. When a computer hacker attacks Titus, his friends, and Violet, they get to know each other without the influence of the feed.

Lesions are starting to form on the people in the book, but this predicament has been spun to be stylish as opposed to a sign of serious environmental issues. The world is decaying, but Titus and his friends don’t notice or care. It’s not trendy.

In many ways, the lead character Titus is as shallow as the world he lives in. But he has the potential to be deeper, passionate, unexpected. Violet might be able to get Titus to think, but he’s wired to be as consumerist as everyone else. When faced with difficult questions and a heart-breaking scenario, will Titus rise above the feed?

Feed is a great novel for those interested in YA, dystopian fiction, and science fiction. It’s thought provoking and intelligent. The slang takes a few minutes to get used to—think Clockwork Orange, although more, like, contemporary, like, teen—but it’s worth it since this is an excellent novel for both teens and adults.

On a side note, Feed was a Finalist for the 2002 National Book Award, Young People’s Literature.

 

Title: Feed
Author: M. T. Anderson
Read: March 2011
Source: Barnes & Noble

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