Posts Tagged ‘Winifred Holtby’

Holtby Series #2: The Land of Green Ginger

May 15th, 2012    Posted in 52 Books in one year challenge, ARCs, Classics, Fiction, Kelly, Literary Fiction
 

Following last week’s review of Anderby Wold, here’s the next in our Winifred Holtby series: The Land of Green Ginger.

Joanna dreams of the world beyond Yorkshire, the mystique of faraway places, and is in love with the idea of adventure. At eighteen she meets Teddy Leigh, and he sweeps her off her feet and into a quick marriage before heading to the trenches of World War I.

Teddy returns from the war, but the world isn’t as the magical fairyland Joanna hoped for. Teddy suffers from tuberculosis, and she has to care for him in addition to their two daughters and struggling farm.  She’s overwhelmed by her responsibilities, but she can still dream of the world she wants to see.

When Joanna is asked to take in a lodger it seems like the perfect solution to their financial woes. The lodger, a Hungarian named Paul, has seen the world, and is a healthy man. But Yorkshire in the aftermath of World War I isn’t welcoming to foreign labor, and the neighbors are suspicious of Joanna’s feelings. Will her family survive?

The Land of Green Ginger brings insight into Britain just after World War I while also illuminating the lives of women. Like South Riding and Ander by Wold, the sense of time and place is amazing.

The tuberculosis aspect of the novel is fascinating; it wasn’t until the 1940s that scientists were able to create an antibiotic to cure the disease. (Researchers are still batting TB, as the newer multiple drug-resistant tuberculosis, usually referred to as MDR-TB, has a strong foothold in parts of the world.) During the time period of the novel, patients with TB would go into sanitariums and be exposed to lots of fresh air and proper nutrition. If their immune system could fight the bacterial infection, they might go into remission with the infection dormant, but present. Teddy’s fight and fear of being stuck in a sanitarium is understandable, even if his relationship with his wife is troubling.

Next up: Poor Caroline, the third and final installment in our Holtby Series.

Title: The Land of Green Ginger

Author: Winifred Holtby

Read: March 2012

Source: ARC from Publisher

 

 

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Holtby Series #1: Anderby Wold

May 6th, 2012    Posted in 52 Books in one year challenge, ARCs, Classics, Fiction, Kelly, Literary Fiction
 

A little over a year ago, Masterpiece Theater introduced me to Winifred Holtby and her best-known novel, South Riding. After watching the mini-series, I read the novel, and adored it. Holtby is a strong voice of her time, and her work deserves a wider audience. So imagine my excitement when I was asked if I’d be interested in reading ARCs of the three novels Holtby wrote before South Riding, as they are being re-released this month.

Anderby Wold is set in the East Riding of Yorkshire, and follows the life of Mary Robson. Married to her old, unromantic cousin, Mary has managed to save her inheritance and get her family farm out of debt. Mary feels old before her time, and represents traditional Yorkshire.

Then David Rossiture, a young radical with dreams of organizing the workers. He brings his ideas of socialism into Mary’s world. His eloquence and energy are appealing to Mary, and show her the youthful life she’s never allowed herself to have. When these two worlds collide, whose life will shatter?

Fans of Holtby will want to pick this up and see her first novel. It’s simpler than South Riding, but Holtby’s insight into her changing world is evident.

Next up in our Holtby series: Land of Green Ginger.

 

Title: Anderby Wold

Author: Winifred Holtby

Source: ARC from Publisher

Read: March 2012

 

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A slice of political and day-to-day life: South Riding

June 22nd, 2011    Posted in 52 Books in one year challenge, Award-Winning, Fiction, Kelly, Literary Fiction
 

South RidingWinifred Holtby’s posthumously published novel South Riding is considered the best work of  her too-short career. Set in the fictional “South Riding” area of Yorkshire (but inspired by the real-life East Riding), the novel follows the lives of multiple characters as they navigate life in Yorkshire during the Great Depression.

I read South Riding after watching the Masterpiece Classic adaptation, and I’m sure my opinion was colored by the experience. The TV adaptation focuses on Sarah Burton, the newly appointed Headmistress of the local girl’s school. In many ways she’s the heart of the story, but the novel spends equal time with a large cast of additional characters. While I enjoyed the series, the last hour or so felt a little rushed. The novel feels more complete. I’m glad I’ve read the novel and seen the series.

At its heart, South Riding is a political novel although it does focus on the relationship between Sarah Burton and Robert Carne. Carne is a landowner struggling to stay afloat, caught between providing quality care for a mentally-ill wife and keeping his farm from going bankrupt. His plight shows the lives of farmers and struggling landowners struggling during the depression. Carne is the counterpart to more progressive individuals who want to do more to help the poor—build council estates, new schools, etc—even though the local government doesn’t have the money to pay for it. Yet Carne is sympathetic to the poor, able to relate to them in ways that this fellow committee members can’t. Other councilmen—like Joe Astell—have grand ideas about helping the working (or unemployed) man, and discount the effect of the depression on farmers and landowners like Carne. Characters like the smart, talented, but poor Lydia Holly represent the people who need help while adding human interest to the story.

No description of South Riding is complete without mentioning the salty Alderman Mrs. Beddows (unique since she’s the first woman to sit on the council). She’s a friend to Carne, eventually forms a bond with Burton, and from a literary perspective, is a strong, well-written character throughout the novel.

South Riding is an especially interesting read today given our economic climate. The parallels between political scapegoats, how to best help our communities, etc, are paralleled and make our current situation seem like something we’ve faced before. The novel itself is strongly written, with memorable characters. The sheer number of characters can be daunting, but they help create a large portrait of Yorkshire life.

One final note: South Riding won the illustrious James Tait Black Memorial Prize in 1936.

Read by: Kelly

Title: South Riding
Author: Winifred Holtby
Date Read: June 2011
Source: Public Library

 

 

 

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