Archive for the ‘Short Stories’ Category

Black Dog Reviews’ First Annual Gift Guide

December 11th, 2011    Posted in Dystopian, Fantasy, Fiction, Kelly, Literary Fiction, Middle Grade, Mystery, Non-Fiction, Other Genre, Pop Culture, Popular Fiction, Science Fiction, Short Stories, Uncategorized, Urban Fantasy, Young Adult
 

Looking for gift ideas this Christmas? How about giving a book? Here’s some gift recommendations based on books or series we read during 2011.

Literary Fiction
The Marriage Plot by Jeffrey Eugenides
About: Effortless novel from one of our favorites.
Best for: Fans of The Virgin Suicides or Middlesex; people who enjoy character studies; Fans of Jane Austen, and also of Victorian writers.
Also consider: Game of Secrets by Dawn Tripp or The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake by Aimee Bender.

 

Short Story Collection
20 Under 40: Stories from the New Yorker
About: Sampling of the hottest short-story authors under 40 years old. Great way to find your favorite new literary author.
Great for: fans of short stories, literary fiction.
Also consider: St Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves by Karen Russell, Smoke and Mirrors by Neil Gaiman.

 

Adult Dystopian, Sci-Fi, or Fantasy
Game of Thrones by George R. R. Martin
About: Game of Thrones is a layered high-fantasy novel with high stakes.
Great for: fans of high fantasy, people who like epic sagas.
Also consider: Greywalker by Cat Richardson

 

Southern Gothic
Ghost on Black Mountain by Ann Hite.
Why: Five different female narrators tell the story of Nellie’s unfortunate marriage to Hobbs Pritchard.
Great for: fans of Southern gothic novels, literary ghost stories.
Also consider: Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt

 

Beach Read
Soulless by Gail Carriger
About: Victorian steampunk with supernatural creatures. Mixes romance and humor with a mystery. Absolutely brillant fun read.
Best for: readers with a sense of humor.
Also consider: Dead Until Dark by Charlaine Harris, Outlander by Diana Gabaldon

 

Young Adult Dystopian, Sci-Fi, or Fantasy
Feed by M. T. Anderson
About: Ecological and technology issues, sci-fi, and dystopian blend in this YA novel perfect for boys and girls. Also has one of the best first lines ever: “We went to the moon to have fun, but the moon turned out to completely suck.”
Best for: fans of dystopian or sci-fi.
Also consider: Divergent by Veronica Roth, Girl of Fire and Thorns by Rae Carson, Daughter of Smoke and Bones by Laini Taylor, and Witchlanders by Lena Coakley.

 

Young Adult, Contemporary
Please Ignore Vera Dietz by A.S. King
About: Vera’s journey as grieving high school student with broken family has heart, and her journey rings true.
Best for: YA contemporary fiction.
Also consider: Flash Burnout by L.K. Madigan

 

Pop culture
Cinderella Ate My Daughter by Peggy Orenstein
About: excellent analysis and insight into the “girly-girl” culture invading US society. Go check out the pink toy aisle at your local Target if you don’t believe me.
Good for: parents of daughters, people who deal with children, anyone concerned with the way girls are taught to value themselves.
Also Consider: The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell

 

For Writers

On Writing by Stephen King
About: Great advice and insight into King’s journey.
Best for: writers.
Also consider: Save the Cat! by Blake Snyder

 

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Dual Review: St Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves

March 6th, 2011    Posted in 52 Books in one year challenge, Dual Reviews, Fiction, Kelly, Kim, Literary Fiction, Short Stories
 

Kim: Karen Russell is somewhat of a literary celebrity in the fact that she was one of the youngest writers to be chosen for the New Yorker’s Best 20 under 40. Her most recent novel, Swamplandia! is an extension of the first story we see in her book of short stories, St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves, about a family that makes their living wrestling alligators in a Florida Everglade theme park. If the premise of that story is any indication, Russell is clearly an authority on the strange and weird.

One of the things I liked best about Russell was the sheer inventiveness with which she writes. The setting of her stories are often other-wordly, or towing the line, and she does an excellent job of harnessing interest while keeping within her literary merits. My three favorite stories were: Z.Z.’s Sleep-Away Camp for Disordered Dreamers, The Star-Gazer’s Log of Summer-Time Crime, and St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves. Within these, is some of my favorite writing: they’re stories I like to read, the sort that ooze with talent, and the kind I wish I could write myself. There were others, equally as well written, that I struggled through, or simply lost interest in, and there were a handful I skipped almost entirely. I think any reader who appreciates stories that are constructed outside of the standard literary box would love this book. It certainly has me curious and eager to pick up the already popular, Swamplandia!

Kelly: Like Kim, I also enjoyed this short story collection. I loved the quirky characters, sometimes otherworldly or magical situations, and literary quality. Amongst my favorite stories are “St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves” and “Haunting Olivia.”

I’m definitely curious about Swamplandia!

Title: St. Lucy’s Home For Girls Raised By Wolves
Author: Karen Russell
Read: February 2011
Source: Powell’s Bookstore / Annie Bloom’s Books

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20 Under 40: Stories from the New Yorker

February 21st, 2011    Posted in 52 Books in one year challenge, Fiction, Kelly, Literary Fiction, Short Stories
 

20 Under 40For the first time since 1999, the New Yorker put together a collection of short stories by authors they feel are the up-and-coming writers sure to define American literature. All twenty authors are under forty years old. Half are women.

Like any compilation, some entries appealed to me more than others. All are worth reading, and even if the story or novel excerpt wasn’t for me, I enjoyed debating why the New Yorker chose it. This is a great way to explore new authors before committing to reading his or her novel.

My favorites included Téa Obreht’s “Blue Water Djinn” and Dinaw Mengestu’s “An Honest Exit.”

Read by: Kelly

Title: 20 Under 40: Stories from the New Yorker
Edited by: Deborah Treisman
Read: February 2011
Source: Public Library

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